Events

OPENING EVENT! The 10 Jewish Moral Imperatives: A Jewish Response to a Fractured Society

Sunday, October 22, 2017
7 PM at Temple Chai map
Cost: $18 (Suggested Donation)

Rabbi Dr. Yitz Greenberg

This lecture proposes that the big story is not the deep polarization in American society and internal dissension in Jewry over Israel and communal policy. We are at the opening of a new era in Jewish history in which Jews seek to take power to shape our fate and to repair the world. This is our opportunity to offer Jewish models for tikkun olam to heal a fractured American society and to create a new pluralistic ethic of exercising power within Jewry.

Rabbi Dr. Yitz Greenberg

In the words of Professor Steven T Katz, chair of the Elie Wiesel Center for Judaic Studies at Boston University, “No Jewish thinker has had a greater impact on the American Jewish community in the last two decades than Rabbi Yitz Greenberg.”

Rabbi Dr. Irving Greenberg (known affectionately as “Rav Yitz”) is perhaps the leading Jewish scholar and theologian of our time. An author of many influential books on Jewish thought, ethics, and philosophy, Rav Yitz is the Past President of CLAL: The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership and Past President of Jewish Life Network/Steinhardt Foundation. Prior to these positions he served as Rabbi of the Riverdale Jewish Center, was an Associate Professor of History at Yeshiva University, and the founder, chairman and Professor in the Department of Jewish Studies of City College of the City University of New York. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard and received ordination from Yeshiva Beis Yosef.

Rabbi Greenberg is a singular leader of contemporary American Judaism, having shown leadership on many vital Jewish communal initiatives spanning from the 1960s to the present. He served as Chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council and has written extensively on the complexity of post-Holocaust theology as well as Jewish pluralism with regard to the theology of Jewish-Christian relations and beyond.

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